Part IV is filled with really cool projects. The purpose of this section is to give you some woodworking experience and to progressively build your skills. Chapter 12 leads you through the process of making a project so that you know what you’re getting into before you begin cutting wood. Chapter 13 gets you started woodworking with the easiest project to build — a bookcase. Not just one bookcase, but several, so you’re sure to find one that fits your design ideals. Chapter 14 builds on the skills you developed in Chapter 13 by helping you build tables. Like Chapter 13, you have several table designs to choose from (heck, build ’em all; you can never have too many tables!). Chapter 15 ups the ante by providing projects for making cabinets with either drawers or doors. Again, you get to choose among several really good designs (if I do say so myself).
But before you purchase clamps, build your first project and put it together without glue. Then see how many clamps you think you will need to put enough pressure in all the right spots. Then proceed to purchase that number of clamps. Repeat this process on your next project, and purchase more clamps if needed. See my buying guide for different clamp types, uses, and my favorite brands.
Whether he’s teaching at North Bennet Street School or working in his home shop, furniture maker Dan Faia wants certain essential hand tools close by. As it happens, the compact tool rack also featured in this issue holds them all. Your list may vary, but this comprehensive list of hand tools for layout, surface prep, shaping, and joinery is a good starting point for any aspiring hand-tool woodworker.
24″ for the chopping block. all of my lumber comes from last years spring clean up. currently have Cherry, White oak, Ash, Hard & Soft Maple as Well as Sasafrass on hand there is also Birch in the woods but none of them have needed to come down yet. I keep two single bevel axes one light one Heavy(2-1/2 lb) which I use depends on how my Elbow feels. A Froe is also required. I think going from tree to board is harder than from board to furniture but it depends how much wind is in the tree. I don’t think I would of ever been able to build the required skills if I had to pay for the lumber though I guess I paid in labor. Air dried stuff is some much better to work with its worth it.

Don’t follow the temptation to cheap out and buy a cheap combination square. Because, like me, you will eventually have to replace it because of its inaccuracy. If you want your joinery to fit perfectly, then you need to scribe it accurately with precise marking tools. Unfortunately there is really only one company (that I know of) that makes a super accurate combination square. But fortunately it is amazing, and I use it daily. I’ll talk about it in-depth in the Layout & Measuring Tool Buying Guide.
Oakman, 1/12/2015 If you are planning on remaining a beginner then these are fine but..... The soles of the planes are not flat. Planes will only flatten a surface as flat as their soles and the ones I received are not flat and the work I would need to do in order to flatten the is excessive. The sides of both planes I received are not square. I sharpened the blades after cleaning the shipping oil from them. (they did arrive clean). I did get them adjusted to shave a nice thin strip off the piece I was working on but it was not flat due to the sole issues stated above. Had I performed these tests promptly upon receipt of the planes, I would have returned them. They will serve a purpose but they are not what I expected.
I have so many free woodworking plans on the site, that it is so hard for a beginner to choose something both simple to build and fulfilling. That is why, I decided to make a short list with my top 20 favorite projects that can be built by any person with basic woodworking skills and limited tools. Even if it might look intimidating at first, my detailed plans and step by step instructions make it really easy for anyone to get the job done.

I have so many free woodworking plans on the site, that it is so hard for a beginner to choose something both simple to build and fulfilling. That is why, I decided to make a short list with my top 20 favorite projects that can be built by any person with basic woodworking skills and limited tools. Even if it might look intimidating at first, my detailed plans and step by step instructions make it really easy for anyone to get the job done.
Through and through milling is the simplest and most efficient way to cut a log. Milling through and through results in plain-sawn, rift-sawn, and quarter-sawn boards because the orientation of the growth rings changes as the boards are sliced off the log (see the Choosing the right wood cut for you section later in this chapter for more information).

Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.

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Quarter-sawn: Quarter-sawn milling is the least efficient way to cut a log, but it produces some of the best boards. You can mill a quarter-sawn board in two ways: the preferred way (Figure 2-3 left) and the practical way (Figure 2-3 right). Unless you have a mill of your own or you own the log and have it milled to your specifications, you’re going to have to live with the practical method of quarter-sawing wood. Don’t worry, this is still a great way to mill a log and, because it’s more efficient than the preferred method, it doesn’t cost you an arm and a leg to buy (maybe just the arm).
The very affordable coping saw (often around $20) is regularly used for rough cutting shapes in the board, but especially for removing waste from dovetail joints (one of the most common wood joints). An affordable coping saw will work just fine as long as you have plenty of replacement blades on hand (also very affordable). Read my hand saw buying guide for more detail on brands & features to look for when purchasing a coping saw.
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